Student Loan Repayment Tips – 8 Tips to Keep Your Loan Under Control

The very best way to manage debt is to be debt-free, yet that is easier said than done in today’s economy. However, when it comes to paying for your college education, acquiring debt or student loans to afford the tuition cannot be avoided for many students.

In planning for the successful repayment of your student loan many things must be taken into consideration. To get ahead of the game you should plan to repay the loan before you sign the first promissory note. In a perfect world this might be the case, quite the contrary most student do not consider repayment until after they have graduated from college and land their first job.
Here are some suggested tips to help you make plans to deal with your student loan effectively to ensure repayment success.

Tip #1: You Do the Leg Work
All loans are not equally created. Some loans offer repayment incentives while you are still attending college; this bonus in some cases can be extended even after you have graduated. On the other hand, there are loans that provide no such stipend and the loans are due shortly after you have graduated college. For example, the Federal Family Education Loan Program (FFELP) loan charges a 3% loan origination fee; one stimulus is the proposal to pay this fee for students. The student in-turn has more money to off-set the cost for books, school supplies and living expenses.

An example of the incentive after graduation would be the fact that you could qualify for reduced interest rates. Also, should a student want to repay the loan through an automatic withdrawal system, like payroll deduction, for example, the probability of receiving this incentive is even greater? As you can see, there are notable differences in each student loan; that is why it is necessary to ensure that you have a thorough understanding of what each loan offer; and choose the one that provides the best incentives.

Tip #2: Read Your Mail
Typically, student borrowers get tons of information concerning the student loan. The student receives mail, normally, immediately prior to, throughout and following graduation from college. Consequently, it is crucial that you read through the entire stack of mail carefully. Therefore, if you have concerns, or there is information you do not understand; by knowing what is going on now you can get the problem resolved right away. Remember, it is necessary to ask if things are not clear, don’t ignore the mail or you might miss out on a critical deadline or important information you need to act on concerning the loans.

Tip #3: Organize that Mountain of Paperwork
Save all of your student loan paperwork and correspondences, as soon as you get it in the mail in the mail. That way, you are going to know exactly what you agreed to, what is expected from you at loan repayment, and also to remind you how much you have borrowed, which is extremely important. It is interesting how signing the promissory note for your loan is so exciting, repaying the loan seems far away, but only for a while. Four years of college pass by quicker than you think. Before you know it, you are graduating, and the student loan repayment is glaring you in the face.

Organization and having the ability to put your fingertips on the loan paperwork will assist in alleviating a lot of the panic. To make things easy for you, begin by establishing a good, easy to use, record-keeping system in which you are able to keep your student loan paperwork and correspondence. The bookstores and libraries have books and software products on personal finance and organization that will help you get going. No matter what filing system you choose, whether document folders, binders, portfolios, or envelopes, create one file for each loan or account you have, and keep your items categorized appropriately. Additionally, while organizing your record-keeping system, make sure that it is safe. The record-keeping system should be kept free from thieves or fire. A number of professionals also recommend that you need to keep your student loan documents and correspondences until they are all totally paid off. This is what you need to keep a record of.

*Essential paperwork like your college student loan applications, promissory notes, disbursement and disclosure statements, and also loan transfer notices. * Copies of all correspondences concerning your student loan company and/or servicing company, such as your school’s financial aid office. * Contact and phone number of the loan provider.

Tip #4: Be Present at all Required Entrance and Exit Sessions
When you take out a student loan, you will have to complete the student loan counseling sessions. Some schools give this on-line and the sessions will not require a considerable amount of your time. They will give you a significant amount of information concerning your rights as well as your obligations as a student borrower.

Tip #5: Budget Finances Like a Pro
The adage when you live to impress when you are in school, you might live like a pauper when you have completed your degree. Quite simply, it is essential that you learn the best way to manage your hard earned money when you are going to school. Frugality can help you reduce the amount of the loan you apply for; as well as reduce the total amount you are going to be responsible for paying back. Here are a few sensible techniques worth taking into consideration:

* Prepare realistic budgets while you are going to school and even after you graduate. This will probably enable you to borrow only what you need, providing you an excellent opportunity to pay back the loans. * Learn how to live as inexpensively as possible. Bear in mind you are only a college student. You can enjoy a much more trouble-free life if you graduate with little to no financial debt. Many excellent tips on how to be cash conscious include finding a roommate, renting a video rather than going to the theater, and taking your lunch from home rather than going out to restaurants.

Thriftiness is the name of the game, so be as thrifty as you possibly can. * For virtually any credit card debts you receive, try to pay off the total amount due. * Set up a financial budget for yourself and stick to it. As long as you are in college, it will be beneficial to see how you can avoid the desire of using credit cards or your student loan money to purchase items that are not contained in your spending budget. Never simply purchase unneeded items. * If at all possible, check out work-study or other part-time job. Finding a part-time job will give you the chance to gain useful specialized experience, as well as providing additional income to cover expenses.

Tip #6: Retain at least Half-Time Enrollment
If you are thinking about half-time enrollment, it is essential to ensure that you are eligible for an in-school deferment. The part-time enrollment usually takes six credit hours. Check with you educational institution requirements concerning the prerequisites for half-time standing.

Tip #7: Make the most of Tax Cost savings
A number of college students who take out student education loans qualify for tax breaks. To determine your status, seek advice from your tax consultant. The breaks are now determined by your qualified college tuition repayments, and in addition, they will help decrease how much Federal tax you have to pay. If you are paying interest on a student loan, it is possible to receive a deduction on your individual Federal tax return for all interest payments. When, you get the advantage of the tax credit as well as the deductions, use the extra tax reimbursement to pay down your student loan, or to take care of the educational expenses.

Tip # 8: Show Me the Money
College graduations is now behind you and your new careers looms just ahead, but guess what; it is now time to repay those student loans. Some loans come due soon after college graduation while other loans allow a bit of time before repayment is due. The bottom line is the loan will have to be paid. Here are some recommendations when you enter the repayment period:

* Submit the loan payment as soon as it is due each month for the full payment amount or even more. This should be done no matter whether you receive a monthly bill or not. *Understand the pay off alternatives offered by your student loan lenders. One option allow you to decrease the loan by making larger monthly payments, and other option allow you reduce your initial monthly bills by making it easier to repay the loan early in your career.

*Contact your lender and inform them immediately of any change in your name or address; if you have questions about your college bill; making payments on time is a problem; loan deferment or forbearance might be needed to help you through a financial crisis. *Make sure you clearly comprehend all mail you receive from your student loan lender and respond immediately when notified. For Further Information concerning your student loans, always remember that the financial-aid office at your school should be your first point of contact. Additionally, there are a number of publications from the Federal and state governments, lenders and college admissions office, libraries and your local bookstore.

Here’s to your success!

The History of Student Loans in Bankruptcy

Student loans are basically non-dischargeable, almost everyone knows this. There are some very specific circumstances where even today you can have your student loan debt discharged, but that is a narrow exception that often requires a fight and money to fight. We will discuss the current state of dischargeability in a future post.

The landscape around student loans and bankruptcy has not always been so desolate. Not so long ago these loans were dischargeable. Back when they were dischargeable, the cost of an education was much lower and the total student loan debt was a fraction of what it is now. With student loan debt currently being a 1,200,000,000,000.00 (One Trillion Two Hundred Billion) dollar problem holding people back from purchasing homes or taking part in the broader economy, with a little help they may become dischargeable yet again.

A Brief History.

Student loans really did not pop into existence in America until 1958 under the National Defense Education Act. 1. These loans were offered as a way to encourage students to pursue math and science degrees to keep us competitive with the Soviet Union. 2. In 1965, the Guaranteed Student Loan or Stafford Loan program was initiated under the Johnson Administration. Over time, additional loan programs have come into existence. The necessity of loans for students has become greater as the subsidies universities receive have fallen over time. Take Ohio State for example. In 1990, they received 25% of their budget from the state, as of 2012 that percentage had fallen to 7%. In the absence of state money, universities and colleges have increased tuition to cover the reduction in state money.

The Rising Cost of Education.

The cost of higher education adjusted for inflation over time goes something like this, in 1980 the average cost for tuition room and board at a public institution was $7,587.00 in 2014 dollars and by 2015 it had gone up to $18,943.00 in 2014 dollars. The cost of a higher education in 35 years with inflation accounted for has gone up by 2.5 times. Compare this to inflation adjusted housing costs which have remained nearly unchanged, increasing just 19% from 1980 to 2015 when the bubble and housing crisis is removed. 3. Or compare to wages which, except for the top 25%, have not increased over that same time period. Looking at affordability in terms of minimum wage it is clear that loans are more and more necessary for anyone who wants to attend university or college. In 1981, a minimum wage earner could work full time in the summer and make almost enough to cover their annual college costs, leaving a small amount that they could cobble together from grants, loans, or work during the school year. 4. In 2005, a student earning minimum wage would have to work the entire year and devote all of that money to the cost of their education to afford 1 year of a public college or university. 5. Now think about this, there are approximately 40 million people with student loan debt somewhere over the 1.2 trillion dollar mark. According to studentaid.gov, seven million of those borrowers are in default, that is roughly 18%. Default is defined as being 270 days delinquent on your student loan payments. Once in default, the loan balances increase by 25% and are sent to collections. The collections agencies get a commission on collected debt and are often owned by the very entity that originated the loans, i.e. Sallie Mae.

The Building of the Student Debt Prison.

Prior to 1976 student loans were dischargeable in bankruptcy without any constraints. Of course, if you look back at statistics from that time, there wasn’t much student debt to speak of. When the US Bankruptcy Code was enacted in 1978, the ability to discharge student loans was narrowed. Back then, in order to have your loans discharged, you had to be in repayment for 5 years or prove that such a repayment would constitute an undue hardship. The rationale for narrowing the discharge was that it would damage the student loan system as student debtors flocked to bankruptcy to have their debt discharged. The facts, however, did not support this attack. By 1977 only .3% of student loans had been discharged in bankruptcy. 6. Still, the walls continued to close on student debtors. Up until 1984, only private student loans made by a nonprofit institution of higher education were excepted from discharge. 7. Next with the enactment of the Bankruptcy Amendments and Federal Judgeship Act of 1984, private loans from all nonprofit lenders were excepted from discharge. In 1990, the period of repayment before a discharge could be received was lengthened to 7 years. 8. In 1991, the Emergency Unemployment Compensation Act of 1991 allowed the federal government to garnish up to 10% of disposable pay of defaulted borrowers. 9. In 1993, the Higher Education Amendments of 1992 added income contingent repayment which required payments of 20% of discretionary income to be paid towards Direct Loans. 10. After 25 years of repayment the remaining balance was forgiven. In 1996 the Debt Collection Improvement Act of 1996 allowed Social Security benefit payments to be offset to repay defaulted federal education loans. 11. In 1998, the Higher Education Amendments of 1998 struck the provision allowing education loans to be discharged after 7 years in repayment. 12. In 2001, the US Department of Education began offsetting up to 15% of social security disability and retirement benefits to repay defaulted federal education loans. In 2005, “the law change” as we call it in the Bankruptcy field further narrowed the exception to discharge to include most private student loans. Since private student loans were given protection from discharge in bankruptcy there has been no reduction in the cost of those loans. 13. If the rational for excepting student loans from discharge is that the cost to students to obtain loans would soar, this fact would seem to lay waste to that argument.

In the wake of the slow march towards saddling our students with unshakable debt, the government created a couple of ways to deal with government backed student loans outside of bankruptcy. In 2007 the College Cost Reduction and Access Act of 2007 added income based repayment which allows for a smaller repayment than income contingent repayment, 15% of discretionary income and debt forgiveness after 25 years. 14. In 2010, the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010 created a new version of income-based repayment cutting the monthly payment to 10% of discretionary income with debt forgiveness after 20 years. 15. This new improved income based repayment plan is only for borrowers who have no loans from before 2008. Further, those with loans in default, will not qualify for income based repayment unless they first rehabilitate those loans. If you are interested in seeing if your loans qualify for income based repayment or income contingent repayment please visit student aid dot gov. Unfortunately, none of these programs do anything to deal with private loans, a growing problem currently at around $200,000,000,000.00 (Two Hundred Billion) or around 16% of the total student loan debt.

What Can We Do?

The cost of education is relentlessly marching upward, the need for a higher education to earn a living wage is only becoming greater, and the ability of our graduates to repay these loans is diminishing. Why is the cost of education outpacing inflation by so much? Why are state and local governments reducing funds they used to devote to college students? These are questions that need to be addressed as well. My focus is on the unavailability of a real discharge option and how it is weighing down the rest of the economy. This is a problem. On September 8, 2015, Michigan Congressman Dan Kildee introduced a bill in Congress intended to reduce the burden on students and their families caused by the increasing costs of education and the financial stress of student loans. 16. The proposed legislation would do away with the exception to discharge listed in 11 U.S.C. ยง 523 (a)(8). If you want to have your say on this issue, call your congress person today and let them know that where you stand on H.R. 3451

All the Best,

Steven Palmer, Esq.
Licensed in WA and OH

1. http://www.eoionline.org/blog/the-great-cost-shift-college-was-once-a-ticket-to-opportunity-now-its-a-roadblock/
2. P.L. 85-864; 72 Stat. 1580
3. Case Schiller Home Price Index, Inflation Adjusted
4. Student Debt: Bigger and Bigger, Center for Economic and Policy Research by Heather Boushey (Sept. 2005).
5. Boushey (Sept. 2005)
6. ENDING STUDENT LOAN EXCEPTIONALISM: THE CASE FOR RISK-BASED PRICING AND DISCHARGEABILITY, 126 Harv. L. Rev. 587
7. Financial Aid dot Org, Questions, Bankruptcy
8. Crime Control Act of 1990, P.L. 101-674, 11/29/1990
9. P.L. 102-164, 11/15/1991
10. P.L. 102-325, 7/23/1992
11. Debt Collection Improvement Act of 1996, P.L. 104-134, 4/26/1996
12. P.L. 105-244, 10/7/1998
13. 126 Harv. L. Rev. 587
14. P.L. 110-84, 9/27/2007
15. P.L. 111-152, 3/30/2010
16. http://www.ncbrc.org/blog/2015/09/15/proposed-bill-eliminates-student-loan-discharge-exception/

What Is the Student Loan Consolidation Rate

The student loan consolidation is the merging of several student loans, and is done to save money on interest and for the convenience of one payment instead of several. There are plenty of things you should know about student loan consolidation, and this site provides the information you need to make a decision.

Consolidation Loan – Information
It is very likely that if you went to college is likely to stay with some kind of student loan debt. Each year, borrow, this is a new and unique loan that helps pay for your tuition and living expenses. When all is said and done, however, one of the best ways to save money is through student loan consolidation. In a student loan consolidation you get a loan paid in full.

The student loan consolidation is a mystery to many college students and graduates. The truth is, however, the consolidation loan can save you much money. In addition, you can pay off your debt faster so that your college years are not chasing you in your retirement years. What a relief loan consolidation provides students.

There are many ways you can get a consolidation loan. You can get federal loans, a bank or a private lender, but no matter what you choose to do so; consolidation will have a big effect on getting out of college under their debt. The idea is that it takes only one payment per month, so you can pay your debt off faster and with lower monthly payments than you think normally.

Loan consolidation current students
It is a fact that almost half of all college students graduate with a degree of student loan debt. The average debt of $ 20,000 is focused on. That means an entire population of young people with serious debt and no education on how to deal with it. Most do not know, but the truth is that many of these students are met to consolidate loans and at school.

Despite what many believe, student loan consolidation does not have to wait until after college. In fact, there are many benefits that have been consolidating while you are still in school. Consolidating student loans while in school can lessen the debt before you even start to pay debts. That, however, is only the beginning.

Another advantage of the consolidation of student loan debt while still in school is that you can avoid any increases in interest. In July 2006, interest rates for federal student loans rose sharply. There is nothing that prevents this kind of tours that take place once again. The sooner your debt is consolidated and locked, the less likely victim of a rapid rate of rise.

As with anything, make sure that consolidating student loan debt before you graduate will work for your specific situation. In most cases, however, is a good financial base and move forward. Lightening your debt before he was even paying it is a great benefit. Indeed, it can be the difference in paying their loans off in 10 years or 30 years.

Benefit Credit
Consolidating your student loan debt can do more than just reduce your long-term debt. The fact is that consolidation could help you increase your credit score during the loan. This, in turn, will help you buy a better car, get the house you want, or end up with a lower rate credit card. But how can a debt consolidation student loan can help you increase your credit? Consider some of the measures used by credit rating agencies reporting.

First, further opening the accounts with the lowest score will be, in general. Throughout his student life, which will be held until 8 loans to pay for their education. Each of these is shown as a separate account with its own interest payments and principal. By consolidating, you close the accounts to one account. So instead of 8 open accounts, you have one. This right will not help you qualify.

Second, you will have lower payments after you have consolidated your student loans. When the number of agencies reporting your credit score, they do looking at their minimum monthly payment. Instead of having several payments per month for your student loans, you have a payment that is less than the sum of the payments of age. Again, consolidation helps your score.

As a final point, that improving your debt to credit rationing. When your score is figured, the presentation of reports have companies check your debt to available credit test versus credit used. When you have more credit available, but less used (like when you consolidate student loan debt) after the case of a higher score. So, if for no other reason, consider consolidating to help your credit score.

Beware of traps when you make loan consolidation
As we approach the end of his college career, you have undoubtedly received a number of flyers, mail and e-mail about consolidating your loans. Each company has any reason you should go to them for their consolidation. However, you should be aware that sometimes there are many catches all those promises. Knowledge of the catch can help you prepare to make a wise decision on your consolidation loan. Do not drop the first consolidation of trading that falls into your lap. Carefully consider the options that are delivered to you.

A bonus can be offered is common to all discounts. They will tell you that if you make a series of payments on time, you will receive a discount. The only problem is that to maintain the discount, you have to make timely payments for the loan after that. That may have up to 20 years. A delay in the payment in one day during that time and “discount” is gone.

Another way to get caught in a plus is when you receive the offer of an all in one building. In this loan, the company offers to take in all of its debt, including credit cards, car loans, and any other debt you have. It is tempting to have everything wrapped into one loan, but lose the ability to defer its predecessor or student loans. The loan will no longer be protected as a student loan.

As a final point, be careful with changing your email address or moving. One or two letters misdirected, or worse, the wrong orientation of emails and a lender can make you pay the price. You could lose a discount or paid excessive fees. Therefore, it is unaware of any company that offers strictly to work with you via email.

Know what you get when it comes to consolidation loans
It is important to be familiar with what they are entitled under the Higher Education Act. There are certain advantages for a federal student loan and consolidating it. Note that many lenders offer special advantages consolidation as these that are giving away. They are, in fact, offers to do. Consider some of the most common.

At the same time if you got a letter advertising the beauty is that a company is willing to offer a fixed rate? If you have, not surprisingly. In fact, everyone should offer a fixed rate under the Higher Education Act. This is not a bonus, just what you expect. Do not drop the line that are offering more than they deserve.

Another you might notice is that there will be a credit check. Again, this is not only common but also necessary. All companies that work with the student loan consolidation have to do without a credit check. Knowing what a company is obliged to offer you help in determining if the institution is actually offering a bargain or are misleading, you may believe you are getting a real bargain, more than are required to receive by law.

As a final point, you should never have prepayment penalties. No matter what the company advertises that all their loans without prepayment penalties consolidate. This is nothing special. When you are seeking privileges, then just make sure you are offering something really special.

Myths about consolidation loans
As with any financial matter, there are a lot of misinformation floating around the student loan consolidation. These little myths often keep people from consolidation when, in fact, is best for them. By taking a look at some of the most common myths, you will be able to understand what is true and what is not there.

It is absolutely certain that you will lose your eligibility deferment if consolidating your student loans. By consolidating, in fact, to keep the core deferments can be a great help pay part of the time. Deferrals can be made because in school, go to graduate school, economic hardship, unemployment and to name a few.

Consolidating your student loan is not like this refinancing the house necessarily. Some people worry that if they consolidated from over payments and interest and will end up paying more in the long run. That’s not true. On the one hand, you can pay early with no penalty. Second, get a better rate and can repay all loans under which a fee. The consolidation, if anything, reduce the term loan when it’s all said and done.

As a last point, it is easy to think that consolidation is for those who do not know what they are doing with their loans. It is unclear whether this idea comes from, but is so common that many believe it is and the avoidance of consolidation. The truth is that consolidating your student loans, in most cases, a sound financial move. You save money and reduce the loan period. It’s that simple.

Loan consolidation, as do
The process of getting your student loans consolidated is surprisingly easy. Once you have determined that you use for your consolidation application is only about a page long. Even more exciting is that there are several ways to fill the requests. Take a look at the various options available to you so you can decide which way works best for you.

One option is, of course, do so in person. You can always go to the bank or financial institution that is to consolidate your loan and take care of it. Fill, sign, and he did and in his way. The lender will review your request and contact you with your decision. Whatever, if they live nearby?

Surprisingly, you can complete your application over the phone. It is not really fill you on the phone, but the introduction of information you can go ahead and lock types for consolidation. Once you have done this, it will likely be sent by email or documents for you to finish complete, sign and send back in.

Third, at this time is not surprising that you can complete your application consolidation loan over the Internet. Many lenders have secure websites with the application there to fill. Once they do fit, you get a copy, and all the care within days.

Find your lender
Obviously, before it can consolidate, you need to find a lender with which to organize their consolidation. Fortunately, there is much competition out there, which means two things. This means that companies are easy to find and they are all willing to compete for your business.

The first place to look may be just around the corner or in your mailbox. As we approach the end of school or after the change, about every lender will send you a flyer, email, brochures, catalogs or information about the consolidation of their packages. There is nothing wrong with looking through these free brochures. Many times you will find a good package that way.

Another option, of course, is to talk to your school’s financial aid office. Someone can help you find what you need. What’s more, they have had experience in the area to know what to look for and what to avoid.

As a final point, you can watch online. There are many options available and easy to shop that way. Be sure to contact the places in person or by phone, however, before completing paperwork. That way you can be sure that everything is at maximum and more. It’s a good way to avoid online fraud and only those who seek their harvest information and move on.

As you can see, there are many options to find your company to consolidate student loans. Just make sure you always compare and ask questions. In the end, the best consolidation company is giving you what you want.

Problems with your payment?
No matter what you do with the consolidation, it is possible that your student loan debt can become too high. With only ten years to repay, could end up with fairly high payment, especially if you go to graduate school or even add more years to student work. Stop payments can really put a cramp in your financial situation. There is an answer, however. If loans and payments are too unbearable, you can always expand. You can take the loan and stretch over years in many cases.

Although the standard is 10, your consolidation loan can, in most cases, taken out much longer. You can stretch to 15, 20 or even 30 years. You will earn more interest that way, but with a lower monthly payment, you will have more capital available with which to live your life. You have to decide if you are willing to pay more in interest to make your finances more manageable.

Think of it like this. Would you rather own a home and a new car while paying a little more interest, or if you do not pay their loans off in 10 years, but years pass, in a small apartment with a bad car and not rent available? Most prefer the former over the latter. Therefore, there is no shame in extending the loan if that is what we do.

Private Student Loans Or Alternative Education Loans Can Fill The Gap To Pay For College

Private loans, also known as alternative or private student loans, are providing a growing number of college students with much-needed education funds to cover college-related expenses that may not be covered by award caps, Federal student loans, scholarships and grants. As long as proof of enrollment is provided to your lender, and you qualify, you could use a private loan to pay for almost any of your educational expenses. Some private loan lenders even let you borrow to pay for previous school fees.

Got bad credit, no credit? That’s not a huge obstacle – as you will find out, using a qualified co-signer when applying for a private loan can mean a greater chance to get approved for your loan, a lower interest rate and a higher loan award!

Private student loans – Pay for just about all your college-related expenses, not just tuition

It’s important to take advantage of Federal student loans first, because they usually offer the lowest student loan interest rates.

To apply for Federal student loans, just complete a Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA Form). However, Federal student loans may not be enough to pay for your tuition, not to mention other costs of attending college.

What’s especially valuable about private loans is that you may use them to pay for practically all your college-related expenses, including:

  • Tuition and fees
  • Books and supplies
  • Computer/laptop
  • Room and board
  • Transportation
  • Living expenses

Private student loans help you get you the education funding money you need

Unlike Federal student loans, private loans distribution amounts are not solely based on predetermined need – you can apply to borrow as much or as little as you feel you need to cover any of your educational expenses. Just be sure not to over borrow to keep your student loan debt at a manageable level.

Depending on the type of private loan you are seeking, many private loan lenders offer qualified borrowers private student loans as little as $500 or as much as $40,000 or more per year to cover your cost of attendance, less other aid you may receive (such as grants, scholarships or Federal student loans).

Applying for a private student loan could get you the money you need EASIER and FASTER

While approval for Federal student loans requires time and the need for financial aid forms, you could be pre-approved for a private loan within minutes of applying and your funds could be sent to you within just days of final approval! Many times the private loan application process is very simple and can even be done either over the phone or online.

Not a full-time student? You can still apply for a private student loan!

Even if you’re taking just a couple courses, you could still be eligible to receive a private student loan to cover the expenses. Most private loan lenders will give you a loan whether you’re attending college full-time, part-time or half-time.

Unlike Federal student loan awards that are based on an individual’s financial need and EFC (Estimated Family Contribution) amount, private loans allow you to apply for as much money as you think you’ll need to cover your educational expenses. Even International students with an eligible U.S. co-signer are eligible for private loans. Most private loan lenders have just a few criteria for an individual to be eligible to apply for a private loan, such as:

  • Must be creditworthy applicant or have a creditworthy co-borrower;
  • Must be a U.S. citizen, U.S. permanent resident, or international student with qualified U.S. citizen or U.S. Permanent Resident co-signer;
  • Must be within the age of majority by your state (typically 18 years of age);
  • Other qualifications, such as employment status and history, enrollment verification and attendance at a qualified school, and income verification are often required by most private loan lenders.

A plethora of private loan types available

Many private loan lenders have private loan products tailored specifically for your student status, including:

  • Undergraduate students;
  • Graduate students;
  • Medical students;
  • Law students (Law School and Bar Study Loans) and other professional degree seekers;
  • Continuing education students;
  • Kindergarten through high school, especially for private schools (also known as K-12 private loans)

Getting a private student loan or alternative student loan is based on your own creditworthiness

Because private loans are made by private institutions rather than the government, your ability to get a loan is based on your credit history, ability to repay a loan, employment history, debt-to-income ratio and other criteria. As a student, you may not have had the opportunity to build up a solid credit history. That’s why having a co-signer can be in your best interest (no pun intended!).

Got bad credit or no credit? No worries, having a co-signer can help you get a private loan!

Since the loan amount and your interest rate will be based on several criteria of merit, often a credit-worthy co-signer could not only increase your chance of getting approved but also help you obtain the loan amount you’ve requested along with a lower interest rate. In addition, using a co-signer can help improve your own creditworthiness.

Unless you’re employed full-time, have excellent credit and a decent annual income, it is often recommended to include a creditworthy co-signer when you apply for your private loans to increase the chance of qualifying for one. Your co-signer can be a parent, relative or other creditworthy adult.

Many private student loan or alternative loan lenders give you various repayment terms and options for greater flexibility and manageability of your private loan balance

Most private loan lenders will defer your payments while you’re in college (length of time determined by the type of program you studied) and give you a grace period of 6 months before you are required to start repayment to give you time to get financially situated after college. To make things even more convenient, many private loan lenders will give you a choice of repayment terms, including:

  • Immediate payment of principle and interest; or,
  • Immediate repayment of interest only; or,
  • In-school deferred repayment of principle and interest until leaving college.

Forbearance options may also be available during repayment should you experience economic hardship.

When it comes to paying back your private loans, many lenders give you up to 20 or 25 years based on your original loan balance and type of private loan.

No pre-payment penalties mean that so long as you make your minimum payment, you can pay off your loans as quickly as you want, without any additional costs or fees!

Many lenders offer their private loan borrowers valuable money-saving benefits. So take advantage of such savings, including: An interest rate discount for automatic payment from a savings or checking account; An interest rate discount for simply making on-time payments. Little or no origination fees, if you or your co-signer has good credit

Need more money to pay for college? Private student loans are here for you!

As you start or continue your education, remember that the availability of private loans [http://www.onesimpleloan.com/private_loans.asp?referer=ezineprivateloans] offers you an option to fund your education when you don’t know where else to turn for the money you need.